Ingredients

  • 5 pounds x Potatoes
    • Yukon Gold Potatoes
    • Russet Potatoes
  • Salt
  • 2 cups x Heavy Cream
  • Butter
    • Kerrygold
  • White Pepper
  • Scallions
  • 1 head x Garlic
  • Powdered Garlic
  • Rosemary

Equipment

  • Large Pot (for Potatoes)
  • Sauce Pan (for Garlic Cream)
  • Knife
  • Strainer (for Garlic Cream)
  • Towel (for peeling potatoes)
  • Potato Ricer or Fork
  • Oven

Process

Preparation

  • Peel & crush Garlic

Cooking

Roasting Potatos

  • In Oven: Bake Potatoes
    • 450* F for 45 minutes

Preparing Garlic Cream

  • In Sauce Pan:
    • Melt Butter
    • Add Heavy Cream
    • Add Crushed Garlic
  • On Low Heat: Simmer for 20 minutes
  • Remove Garlic Cream from heat
  • Add Scallions & Rosemary to Garlic Cream
  • Using Strainer: Strain Garlic Cream
  • Add Salt & Pepper

Peeling Potatoes

  • With Towel: Peel Potatoes
    • Avoid breaking potatoes

Puree’ing Potatoes

  • Using Ricer or Fork: Rice/Mash Potatoes

Mixing everything

  • Add Garlic Cream Riced Potatos

Seasoning

  • Add White Pepper
  • Add Garlic Powder
  • Add Salt

Advice

  • Butter / Potato Ratio: 1:4 minimum (aim for 1:2)
  • The more you cook garlic the less like garlic it will taste.
  • “What I do is melt whatever amount of butter and duck fat I’m going to put in the potatoes in a pot, fry off maybe 6 cloves of minced garlic per lb of potatoes in the oil/butter for only two minutes. Take everything off the heat, and add my potatoes using a potato ricer. Then add salt, pepper, cream and extra butter as I feel necessary. If you aren’t happy with your mash, keep adding butter until you are. A good butter too, something like Kerrygold.
  • “Take Idaho potatoes, boil them, whole skin on at a low simmer until soft consistency throughout, (keeping them whole and skin on keeps the starches intact and gives you a velvetier finished product) take my heavy cream and melt my butter into my heavy cream, half to half ratio cream yo butter in oz, also add crushed garlic cloves then simmer for about 15-20 minutes on low, then add herbs to my cream to steep like tea for a few minutes at the end. Strain cream and butter mixture from garlic and herbs to use for puree. After potatoes are cooked whole skin on, I peel it with a towel, so I can be gentle not to break the potatoes and fracture the starches, put the whole potatoes through the ricer, add cream and butter mixture till desired texture, then season. For my seasoning I personally like just a touch of white pepper and salt to taste”
  • “as an industry worker I can definitely tell you that there are three things that will change your potato game: dry roasting your potatoes whole, a food mill for processing the potatoes, and also steep your garlic in your dairy. Cooking your potatoes dry means that the only liquid you introduce is your garlic flavored heavy cream and is next to impossible to be bland and flavorless. The food mill will provide minimal interaction with the potatoes and thus will work the starches less than a ricer and creating a softer and fluffier textur; one of the downsides to using a mixer or even a ricer is that working the potatoes too much gives them a stickier texture that a food mill will avoid. Finally, steeping the garlic in the heavy cream will spread the flavor around much better than a roasted bulb that is cooked separately. You could roast the bulb but give it some time to steep in your dairy and I’m sure you’ll find your garlic flavor is a lot more pronounced when you do it this way. I used to boil potatoes before I’d mash them until one of my chefs put mashed potatoes on the menu and we started using this method. The water gets trapped in the potatoes and will dilute your flavoring liquid when you add it, thus creating a less tasty potato. Restaurant food does include a lot of butter and salt, but in this case I think you are 97% on the right track but you just need some minor adjustments”
  • “I’m a chef, and the best mash ive tasted had: potatos, kumara (sweet potato) butter, cream, translucent onion, garlic, italian parsley, cajun spice, salt and freshly ground black pepper. OM NOM NOM”

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